When I was little my Mum always took me to buy shoes in a shoe shop in our local town. They had a basement room for children which smelled of leather, had a wall of cardboard shoe boxes, and where I had to put my foot in one of these slidy things  to determine what size I was! It also seemed to have this wallpaper for almost all of my childhood:

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These cartoons were very popular during the 70s and 80s and I remember liking the delightfully dotty signature:

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These plump ponies and unfortunate riders could be found in newspaper cartoons, in books and on bowls and other merchandise at the time.

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I liked the super curvy, stodgy horses, always seeming slightly manic and difficult to control.image

Coupled with the inevitable novice rider, trying and failing spectacularly to master their beasts.image

Looking at them as an adult, I can still see the humour and the skill, but actually if you look closer, some of the background artwork is very detailed and, frankly, pretty stunning.

Among the prizes © Norman Thelwell. National Trust hosts Norman Thelwell exhibition of original illustrations from private family archives. Mottisfont welcomes in the New Year with a major exhibition from the private family archives of one of Britainís most popular cartoonists, Norman Thelwell. Best known for his hilarious cartoons of plump little girls on equally spherical ponies, these familiar pictures are joined by other satires of twentieth-century life, alongside beautiful paintings of local landscapes. The exhibition, which features over 70 original artworks, includes many that have never been on show before. First created in the 1950s and published extensively since, Thelwellís pony cartoons are still easily recognisable today. The artist drew the endearing characters Penelope and her mischievous pony Kipper in hundreds of humorous scenarios, from ungainly jumps and gallops to the destruction of country fairs. Thelwell also produced numerous other satirical cartoons, with astute and amusing observations on country life, from gardening and fishing to the upkeep of heritage properties. While these images have given Thelwell a lasting reputation as a talented cartoonist, he is less well known for his beautiful landscape art. Thelwell lived close to Mottisfont ñ an idyllic country house in Hampshire, now owned by the National Trust ñ and captured the surrounding countryside in a series of stunning watercolours.Mottisfontís exhibition reveals many of these pictures, including images of Mottisfont itself, Romsey Abbey, and the landscape and villages of the Test Valley, brought to life by an extraordinary talent for naturalistic painting. Displayed alongside Thelwellís well-loved cartoons, the exhibition demonstrates how the artistís amusing observations on life in the country are rooted in a deep-seated love of the Hampshire landscape. Also on display are a series of never-before-seen sketches and a selection of models which the artist created as protot

It came as no surprise to find that Thewell also exhibited landscapes, many painted near me in Hampshire, showing a great love for this picturesque area.

SOLENT NEWS AND PHOTO AGENCY...NORMAN THELWELL 1970'S. SOLENT NEWS AND PHOTO AGENCY TELEPHONE

Stair Hole, Lulworth Cove © Norman Thelwell. National Trust hosts Norman Thelwell exhibition of original illustrations from private family archives. Mottisfont welcomes in the New Year with a major exhibition from the private family archives of one of Britainís most popular cartoonists, Norman Thelwell. Best known for his hilarious cartoons of plump little girls on equally spherical ponies, these familiar pictures are joined by other satires of twentieth-century life, alongside beautiful paintings of local landscapes. The exhibition, which features over 70 original artworks, includes many that have never been on show before. First created in the 1950s and published extensively since, Thelwellís pony cartoons are still easily recognisable today. The artist drew the endearing characters Penelope and her mischievous pony Kipper in hundreds of humorous scenarios, from ungainly jumps and gallops to the destruction of country fairs. Thelwell also produced numerous other satirical cartoons, with astute and amusing observations on country life, from gardening and fishing to the upkeep of heritage properties. While these images have given Thelwell a lasting reputation as a talented cartoonist, he is less well known for his beautiful landscape art. Thelwell lived close to Mottisfont ñ an idyllic country house in Hampshire, now owned by the National Trust ñ and captured the surrounding countryside in a series of stunning watercolours.Mottisfontís exhibition reveals many of these pictures, including images of Mottisfont itself, Romsey Abbey, and the landscape and villages of the Test Valley, brought to life by an extraordinary talent for naturalistic painting. Displayed alongside Thelwellís well-loved cartoons, the exhibition demonstrates how the artistís amusing observations on life in the country are rooted in a deep-seated love of the Hampshire landscape. Also on display are a series of never-before-seen sketches and a selection of models which the artist created
Stair Hole, Lulworth Cove © Norman Thelwell.

The cartoon ponies and their plump riders will always raise a smile but it’s been nice to find out a bit more about Mr Thelwell and the depths of his talents. I for one, am in awe.

It is with a nod to a great talent I say:

It’s only vintage but I like it!